Mike Aquilina

Historical Sketches

Friday May 11th 2007, 3:07 am

The Resilient Church: The Glory, the Shame, and the Hope for Tomorrow
My collection of historical sketches, The Resilient Church: The Glory, The Shame, and the Hope for Tomorrow, has just rolled off the press. It’s my first book for the good folks at Word Among Us. Here’s what they have to say about it:

Beginning with the earliest martyrs and ending with the twentieth century, The Resilient Church offers a fascinating look at the trials and triumphs of the Catholic Church over the past two thousand years. Fast-paced sketches of critical periods in church history give readers perspective on the challenges faced by the church today. Short selections in each chapter highlight some of the great heroes who influenced the course of history. Mike Aquilina does not shrink from the realities of the past, including badly behaved leaders and those who betrayed the Lord. Yet he also leaves readers with well-founded hope for the future: God remains faithful in every circumstance and fulfills his promise to remain with his church always.

Here’s what the experts say:

Mike Aquilina’s The Resilient Church is an erudite but highly readable illustration of Pope Benedict XVI’s remark that the Lord “encounters us ever anew” in the pages of Church history. Aquilina takes us on a fascinating ramble through the past two thousand years that ultimately delivers a powerful message: No matter how hard the going gets, God does not abandon his people. A work of insight and inspiration.
— Russell Shaw, author of Catholic Laity in the Mission of the Church

The Resilient Church is a wonderfully engaging read and a timely reminder of the ways in which the Lord Jesus has been with His Church throughout the centuries. His well chosen stops along the timeline of history remind us all that in moments of crisis and times of joy, God has always responded to the voices (and hands) of His people raised in prayer. Read this book and discover why a solid understanding of church history is one of the best arguments for the Catholic faith.
— Father Joseph Linck, Church historian and rector of St. John Fisher Seminary, Stamford, Conn.