It’s a Poet Thing
Monday April 06th 2009, 8:45 pm
Filed under: Patristics

Dennis at The Campvs says Paulinus of Nola knew Catullus better than we do.



Free Patristic Audio
Monday April 06th 2009, 8:43 pm
Filed under: Patristics

Commenter Stephan drives a truck and is looking for good patristic audio to keep him company in the cab. 

The goldmine, of course, is the site of Maria Lectrix, which has a whole section dedicated to the Fathers in English translation. (And more linked here.)

iTunes U is offering good stuff from the Augustinian Institute, including lectures by  John Cavadini, John Kenney, Lewis Ayres, and others. I don’t know if it’s possible to link to these, but if you have iTunes you know how to get the files. While you’re at iTunes, search on “early Christianity” and you’ll also find lectures by Thomas Oden (editor of the Ancient Christian Commentary series) and Darrell Bock, whose book The Missing Gospels I reviewed here).

Not too long ago, Sister Macrina posted links to some patristic audio.

I’ve posted some radio interviews and stuff.

A couple years back, a young Orthodox seminarian posted files of lectures by Father Andrew Louth, and I linked from here — but his blog has vanished. Anyone know where the files went?

Anyone know other sources of free patristic audio?



Albania Mania
Friday April 03rd 2009, 10:25 pm
Filed under: Archeology

BBC slide show: A patristic-era Albanian site with a baptistery, early-Christian mosaics and such.



Season Your Psalter
Friday April 03rd 2009, 9:26 pm
Filed under: Books,Patristics

The new book is in!

Praying the Psalms with the Early Christians, co-authored with Chris Bailey, with whom I wrote The Grail Code.

What a joy to read the Psalms as they were read in the early Church. For us, as for the first Christians, the Psalms are a treasury of counsel for ordinary living, insight into the power of the sacraments, praise for God’s glory and mercy, and love for his kingdom, which is the Catholic Church. The Fathers call King David to witness as they preach fidelity in marriage, kindness in speech, and even the mercies of purgatory. As we pray this book, we recognize that ancient Church as our own, and we raise our prayer in unision — no, in communion — with the saints of long ago, who are living still.

— Scott Hahn
Professor of Scripture and Theology
Franciscan University of Steubenville

This June, Chris and I will be helping to host a pilgrimage with Happy Catholic.